Lesson

Up with the Google Fonts Module

After being alerted to Google Fonts, the Google Font API, and the Google Fonts Module in a recent Drupal Planet post (http://acquia.com/blog/robert/google-fonts-api-time-drupal-market-one-day), I dropped my lunch and said, "Rad!" Then I rolled up the sleeves and dropped a few fonts into my blog as easy as the dog drops logs on the lawn. What follow is usage notes and examples on getting this all going for yourself:

How-to wrap your CSS Injector files into a new Zen sub-theme

I frequently use a 3rd party designer to help with the tedious task of going from PSD to final theme. If you haven't realized it yet, but alot of designers have problems setting up a local MAMP install w/ drupal in which to fuck with css. To deal with this without giving the designer any command-line access, my shop uses what we call CZI on all drupal installs. This stands for CSS Injector, Zen theme, IMCE, and allows a designer to upload images and apply css rules to a development site they have been given permissions for on the theme, Zen, that provides all the classes and ids anyone would need.

After my shop, the designer, and the client are satisfied, CSS Injector and it's external files become a weight and need to be removed. Below I detail the process of using Zenophile (http://drupal.org/project/zenophile) to create a zen subtheme in which to wrap up all your CSS Injector files:

Configuring Image Assist in Drupal 6

Image Assist is a great choice for adding images to content in Drupal. This module allows users to upload and insert inline images into posts. It automatically generates an Add image link under the textarea fields of your choice. In this post I will go throught the initial setup of this module, saving usage for a later post.

For a good discussion on multiple ways of importing images into your drupal site and each approaches pros and cons, please see: http://crownedup.com .

  1. Check your Status Report

Drupal Legal Module Provides Required Terms and Conditions

If you want to make any sort of terms and conditions applicable to becoming a member of your Drupal site, I would suggest using the Legal module. It provides for a text agreement that a user must agree to to get an account on the site. The agreement is signified via a single checkbox or multiple custom checkboxes. Additionally, the terms can be updated which requires users to agree to the agreement during their next site visit, a text box also provides for notes on changes.

Installation and Setup for Node Reference View

The Node Reference module defines a field type for use by the Content Creation Kit (CCK) to reference one node from another. It works very good and allows you to add a greater amount of complexity to your site. The only problem with the Node Reference module is that the default display options for the referenced node field are very limited. But thanks to the Node Reference Views module, you can use all the formatting power of the Views module to display your referenced node field.

Formatting Timestamps in Drupal

Most data dealing with times and dates is stored as a as a standard Unix timestamp in Drupal. Examples of this are the node creation and revision dates, or the user creation, login, and access dates. If you access this data directly from the database you will retrieve this highly illegible timestamp. Good thing that Drupal provides a function for formatting dates: format_date().

Czech Lesson 2.4 - Location Words and Genders

For this session I am going to list a number of locations and the gender of the word. When using the locative case, the gender of the location must be determined to proper declenate the location properly. Please see the Locative Case Quick Guide for more information on how to properly declenate these location words by gender.

  • škola : school (Feminine)
  • divadlo : theater (Neutral)
  • pošta : post office (Feminine)
  • moře : sea (Neutral)

Czech Lesson 2.2b - Locative Case Quick Guide

As a final followup on the previous two posts, I have generated a small list that gives the general rules to apply to each genders nouns when in the locative.

Czech Lesson 2.2 - Locative Case Continued

Today's lesson continues with the locative case. I am simply going to expand upon the previous post filling out more of the list of locative example sentances with the neutral and masculine gender.

The Czech language uses the locative case to denote location (for eample: v České Republice/in the Czech Republic) and may also be used after certain prepositions with meanings other than location (for eample: o Praze/about Prague, po revoluci/after the revolution).

Czech Lesson 2.1 - Locative Case

The Czech language uses the locative case to denote location (for eample: v České Republice/in the Czech Republic) and may also be used after certain prepositions with meanings other than location (for eample: o Praze/about Prague, po revoluci/after the revolution).

For my examples I will use 'v/ve' and 'na', which translate roughly as 'in' and 'on'.

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